REPORT: Collins releases statement about calling witnesses for impeachment trial

JANUARY 16, 2020

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News App offers the following information published by TheHill.com:

Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) said on Thursday that it’s “likely” she will support calling witnesses after the initial phase of the impeachment trial, but she has not yet made a decision on any particular individual.

“While I need to hear the case argued and the questions answered, I tend to believe having additional information would be helpful. It is likely that I would support a motion to call witnesses at that point in the trial just as I did in 1999,” Collins said in a statement.

The article goes on to state the following:

Collins is viewed as a crucial swing vote in the Senate impeachment trial, particularly on the procedural fights over whether or not additional witnesses should be called or documents handed over.

Bloomberg reporter Steven Dennis noted: “One key point: Susan Collins plans to block any attempts by Democrats to seek *documents* as well as witnesses at the start of the trial. There are many, many, many documents Trump has blocked from Congress.”

Four Republicans need to support Democrats’ request for witnesses to proceed.

Sen.Mitt Romney (R-Utah) said he wants to hear from former national security adviser John Bolton.

Read Collins statement below:

Senator Collins’ Statement on Impeachment Trial Process

Washington, D.C.—U.S. Senator Susan Collins issued the following statement on the impeachment trial process:

There has been a lot of mischaracterization and misunderstanding about my position on the process the Senate should follow for the impeachment trial.  

Rather than have my position relayed through the interpretation of others, I wanted to state it directly:

1.     From the outset, I have said that we should follow the model that we used with the Clinton impeachment trial.

2.     That process provided for the opportunity for both sides to state their case and for Senators to ask questions through the Chief Justice. 

3.     At the conclusion of that phase of the 1999 trial, the Senate voted on a motion to subpoena witnesses and admit additional materials after the case had been heard and the questions had been posed.  I voted in favor of that motion subpoenaing witnesses. 

4.     For this trial, as was done in 1999, both sides should have the opportunity to state their case and the Senators should have the opportunity to pose questions. Then, the Senate should have an up-or-down-vote on whether to subpoena witnesses and documents. 

5.     While I need to hear the case argued and the questions answered, I tend to believe having additional information would be helpful. It is likely that I would support a motion to call witnesses at that point in the trial just as I did in 1999.  

6.     Prior to hearing the statement of the case and the Senators asking questions, I will not support any attempts by either side to subpoena documents or witnesses.  Instead, that issue should be addressed at the same point that it was in the 1999 trial.

7.     I have not made a decision on any particular witnesses.  When we reach the appropriate point in the trial, I would like to hear from both sides about which witnesses, if any, they would like to call. 

Dennis Michael Lynch (DML), founder of DML News App and TeamDML.com, said Ted Cruz should be the one presiding over the Senate’s impeachment trial. This clip is from a news broadcast for TeamDML subscribers. If you’re missing out on these daily news programs with DML and Michael Cutler, join today at www.TeamDML.com.

To get more information about this article, please visit TheHill.com. To weigh in, leave a comment below.

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