REPORT: Hurricane Florence’s uncertain track sows fear; 10 million in crosshairs

BY TRACY MATHESON / SEPTEMBER 13, 2018 /

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by APNEWS.COM:

MYRTLE BEACH, S.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence put a corridor of more than 10 million people in the crosshairs Wednesday as the monster storm closed in on the Carolinas, uncertainty over its projected path spreading worry across a widening swath of the Southeast.

Faced with new forecasts that showed a more southerly threat, Georgia’s governor joined his counterparts in Virginia and North and South Carolina in declaring a state of emergency, and some residents who had thought they were safely out of range boarded up their homes.

The article goes on to state the following:

The National Hurricane Center’s best guess was that Florence would blow ashore as early as Friday afternoon around the North Carolina-South Carolina line, then push its rainy way westward with a potential for catastrophic inland flooding.

Florence’s nighttime winds were down to 110 mph (175 kph) from a high of 140 mph (225 kph), and the Category 3 storm fell to a Category 2, with a further slow weakening expected as the storm nears the coast. But authorities warned it will still be an extremely dangerous hurricane.

“Do you want to get hit with a train or do you want to get hit with a cement truck?” said Jeff Byard, an administrator with the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

Tropical storm-force winds extended 195 miles (315 kilometers) from Florence’s center, and hurricane-force winds reached out 70 miles (110 kilometers).

The National Weather Service said 5.25 million people live in areas under hurricane warnings or watches, and 4.9 million live in places covered by tropical storm warnings or watches.

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1 Comment

  1. DH September 13th, 2018 at 9:04 am

    The news has even said there is threats to the nuclear plants in the Carolinas. The walls on nuke plants are several feet thick. My hubby has worked in them. They do use water to run the plant and they are saying there is flooding risk from lots of rain. Not sure how protected they are from flooding though. Our electricity is run on nuclear plant so hopefully power dont go out. They are good about getting power on pretty fast. We heard how power companies from other states are heading to Carolinas to help out.

    Reply

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